The Leader Magazine

MAR 2017

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48 MARCH 2017 F E A T U R E A R T I C L E Symantec's super project is a complete 180 from its Superfund past E very organization is looking for an edge. Something to distance it from its competitors. That catalytic mechanism that makes its work product extraordinary and allows its workforce to engage in ways that catapult it beyond a 9-to-5 commitment. The workplace has to be more than just a container that holds an organization's employees. It needs to positively infl uence the people who come in contact with it, not only through created communities of workplace culture, but through the physical impact the built environment has on its inhabitants. The places we inhabit can have a benefi cial impact on our bodies as long as they take into account the way humans are wired. The WELL Building Standard™ aims to do just that. By incorporating design measures that interact with human neurobiology, designers can deliver positive outcomes like increased energy, stronger cognitive and memory capabilities, and increased productivity. That something extra Symantec Corp., the global leader in cybersecurity and one of the world's largest cyber-intelligence networks, was looking for just such a path for its planned headquarters renovation in Mountain View, California. As you might imagine, talent acquisition in Silicon Valley is not for the faint of heart; when the Googleplex is your next-door neighbor, it qualifi es as perhaps the most competitive environment in the world for attracting the best and brightest talent. So when Symantec decided to renovate one of its headquarters buildings, front of mind was its current employee base and the quality of talent it would recruit in the future. During its interview for the project, Little, in association with AP+I Design, reinforced Symantec's interest in salutogenic design and the WELL Building Certifi cation. The software company recognized an opportunity not only to create an environment that would be a great place to work, but to make a tangible and measurable difference in the lives of its employees. The prospect of having its workplace designed to result in a healthier, more productive environment was an attractive one, especially since the Symantec facility would be the fi rst WELL-certifi ed building in Silicon Valley and one of only 200 WELL- certifi ed spaces worldwide. WELL became the competitive edge Symantec leadership was looking for, a pilot for what could ultimately be rolled out to all Symantec buildings globally. A long way from its origins This headquarters renovation also needed to accomplish pragmatic design goals that would support and advance the culture Symantec had built over its 34-year history. Prior to this renovation, the work environment was all built offi ces – no interior glass, no sidelights, no clerestory or windows in doors. Some offi ces hugged the exterior envelope, while others were built-out in rows away from exterior glass. The overall lack of daylight or views resulted in a dark, claustrophobic, uninspired and − just as important − unhealthy workspace. Keeping a bright and inspired future in mind, the Symantec team aggressively sought to create an environment that put employees fi rst: their health, their happiness and their impact on the organization. A place that would be restorative, accommodate activities to support individual and team work-styles as well as idiosyncrasies in posture, and help to eliminate a sedentary lifestyle and create a healthy foundation that would impact employees' wellbeing even outside of work. the Symantec facility would be the fi rst WELL-certifi ed building in Silicon Valley and one of only 200 WELL- certifi ed spaces worldwide. WELL became the competitive edge Symantec leadership was looking for, a pilot for what could ultimately be rolled out to all Symantec buildings globally. A long way from its origins renovation also needed to accomplish pragmatic design goals that would support and advance the culture Symantec had built over its 34-year come in contact with it, not only through created communities of workplace culture, but through the physical impact the built environment has on its inhabitants. The places we inhabit can have a benefi cial impact on our bodies as long as they take into places we inhabit can have come in contact with it, not only through created communities of workplace culture, but through the physical impact the built environment has During its interview for the project, Little, in association with AP+I Design, reinforced Symantec's interest in salutogenic design and the WELL Building Certifi cation. The software company recognized an opportunity not only to create an environment that would be a great place to work, but to make a tangible and measurable difference in the lives of its employees. The prospect of having its workplace designed to result in a healthier, more productive environment was an attractive one, especially since the Symantec facility would the Symantec facility would be the fi rst WELL-certifi ed building in Silicon Valley culture, but through the physical impact the built environment has by Carolyn Rickard-Brideau

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